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Hillsborough, New Hampshire

55 Acres | June 21, 2012
Ken and Vicki Coffin, donors
Conservation Easement

The Humane Society Wildlife Land Trust is the only national land trust that prohibits commercial and recreational hunting and trapping of wildlife on the properties it protects.  This is why, in 2012, Ken and Vicki Coffin signed a second conservation easement on their Hillsborough, New Hampshire, property.

The property has abundant wildlife as noted by the property owner, who provided all of the photos in the video slideshow provided here.  A wood turtle, listed as a NH Species of Special Concern (SC) and a Northern goshawk (S3 ranking) have been observed on or near the property. It is also habitat for bear, coyote, fox, fisher, bobcat and a variety of migratory songbirds.

The Five Rivers Conservation Trust (5RCT) holds the primary conservation easement on the property but their agreement does not prohibit hunting and trapping.  Now both 5RCT and HSWLT will work together to ensure that the land forever remains a wildlife safe haven.

The Coffin Wildlife Sanctuary is a 55-acre parcel, a mix of forest, marsh, wetlands, and streams.  Two streams, one of which drains from the Farrar Marsh Wildlife Management Area (WMA), come together and flow through a wooded area and form a marsh/wetland area.

New Hampshire's Wildlife Action Plan identifies the property as having the “highest ranked habitat in New Hampshire” and “supporting landscapes.”  The "highest ranked habitat" consists of an extensive wetland area that serves as vital habitat for a variety of wildlife including marsh birds, reptiles, amphibians, beaver, and moose. It is considered a "supporting landscape" because it provides connectivity as a wildlife corridor between the NH Fish & Game Farrar Marsh WMA and Low State Forest to the north and Fox State Forest and other privately conserved land to the south.

The Coffin Wildlife Sanctuary is located within thirty-five miles of seven other HSWLT wildlife sanctuaries in southern New Hampshire. 

Although this sanctuary remains privately owned, the Humane Society Wildlife Land Trust has an obligation to perform periodic inspections to ensure that the wildlife habitat remains in good condition and that the terms of the conservation easements are being met.  These inspections, and the handling of any destruction or violations, cost heavily in professional staff time, consultants, and travel expenses. In addition HSWLT needs a reserve of funds for the substantial legal fees needed if enforcement of violations involves court action.

HSWLT has promised to protect this property as sanctuary forever -- and that promise will be kept.  If you can help with the cost of stewardship for this and the other properties HSWLT protects, please donate here.

 

Woodchuck Close-up

The woodchuck, the groundhog, the whistle-pig -- whatever you call him, you have to admit he is a great tunneler.

 

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