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Palmyra, Maine

46 Acres | December 16, 1996
HSWLT
Owned in Title

In 1994, the Leonard Dewes Burgweger Memorial Wildlife Sanctuary became the first acquisition in Maine for the Humane Society Wildlife Land Trust. Pat Foley donated these forty-six acres of forests and wetlands in Palmyra, Maine, to be permanently protected in their natural state. In addition to keeping the landscape undeveloped and guarding against destructive logging practices, HSWLT promised to forever prohibit commercial and recreational hunting and trapping.

For Pat Foley, this land donation fulfilled a lifelong dream of “leaving the world a little better” with a site for the “web of life” to continue unhindered by humans.  “We are destroying habitat and creating an imbalance for the whole planet. And it’s not to our benefit. This is a spot I was in control of,” Ms. Foley said when interviewed by the Bangor Daily News in 1997.

This sanctuary provides safe haven for many animal species including both red and grey foxes, black bear, raccoons, wild turkeys and white-tailed deer. Birds of all kinds are also abundant here. Among those who frequent these woods and wetlands are eastern king birds and the scarlet tanagers.

Ms. Foley purchased the land in the 1970s when she was in search of property where she could enjoy wildlife and natural surroundings. She intended to leave the property to a land trust in her will, but for financial reasons made the decision to donate it earlier. HSWLT met her desire to preserve the land without fear of it being sold or traded, or ultimately developed.

The property is near the Palmyra-St. Albans town line and next to a wildlife management area. The land will always be maintained as a wildlife sanctuary where development, destructive logging practices, commercial and recreational hunting and trapping will be prohibited forever.

The Humane Society Wildlife Land Trust holds the title to this sanctuary.  That means HSWLT is responsible for all property taxes and maintenance costs for the property -- every year, forever.  In addition periodic inspections are made to ensure that the wildlife habitat remains in good condition.  These inspections, and the handling of any damage or destruction, cost heavily in professional staff time and travel expenses.

HSWLT has promised to keep this property as a sanctuary forever -- and that promise will be kept.  If you can help with the cost of stewardship for this and the other properties HSWLT protects, please donate here.

Loon Close-up

Common loons are not all that common. Many states list them as either "threatened" or a "species of special concern."

 

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