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Hayward, California

8 Acres | January 22, 2004
Ellen Gail Levine, donor
Conservation Easement

A conservation easement now permanently protects Ellen Gail Levine’s 8-acre property in Hayward, California, a suburb of Oakland. Due to its proximity to the San Francisco Bay area, population growth has spiked in recent decades, making protection of remaining natural areas especially important for the well being of both people and wildlife.

Forests on the property include oak, eucalyptus, and pine, providing habitat for bears, mule deer, foxes, opossums, skunks, turkey vultures, and various hawk species. A creek on this hillside sanctuary strengthens its habitat value, as does its diverse edge habitat. Concerned that too many acres in her area were being developed, Ms. Levine wanted to ensure that her acres and the wildlife they nurture would be permanently safe from development and other threats. While the Trust will, of course, keep its promise to forever protect this property, HSWLT has, unfortunately, found that it cannot afford to take on the permanent protection obligations for any more properties of this size. The expenses of stewardship have made such donations too costly to maintain.

Although this sanctuary remains privately owned, the Humane Society Wildlife Land Trust has an obligation to perform periodic inspections to ensure that the wildlife habitat remains in good condition and that the terms of the conservation easements are being met.  These inspections, and the handling of any destruction or violations, cost heavily in professional staff time, consultants, and travel expenses. In addition HSWLT needs a reserve of funds for the substantial legal fees needed if enforcement of violations involves court action.

HSWLT has promised to protect this property as sanctuary forever -- and that promise will be kept.  If you can help with the cost of stewardship for this and the other properties HSWLT protects, please donate here.

Owls Close-up

You can help owls by preserving their habitats and using organic methods rather than chemicals to eliminate agricultural pests.

 

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